Kansas Labor Information Center (KLIC)

2010 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

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2010 Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries

Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries
 
The Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) survey provides Kansas's information on the frequency of fatal injuries occurring in the workplace. Fatal injuries occurring in the private and public sectors, the military, the self-employed and certain volunteers are all counted. The CFOI program's methodology ensures that fatality counts are as complete and accurate as possible by cross-referencing diverse data sources in order to identify and verify fatalities. The personal identifiers of individuals and companies are kept confidential. The program provides workplace fatality data by occupational, industrial, and demographic characteristics in addition to the manner in which the fatal injury occurred.
 
One of the criterions for publication requires that three or more incidents of a fatality must have occurred in a specific category before they may be published in a table. If numbers are omitted, and noted as such, it is because they did not meet publication requirements.

 
 
Kansas Fatal Occupational Injuries in Kansas for 2010
 
Chart 1 Workplace fatalities by event or exposure, Kansas, 2010, all ownerships (85 Total fatalities)
Chart 2 Fatal work injuries by location, Kansas, 2010, all ownerships (85 Total fatalities)
Chart 3 Occupations with the largest number of worker fatalities, 2010, Kansas, all ownerships (85 Total fatalities)
Chart 7 Fatal work injuries in selected industries, 2010, Kansas, all ownerships (85 Total fatalities)
   
Table A-1 Fatal occupational injuries by industry and event or exposure, Kansas, 2010
Table A-2 Fatal occupational injuries resulting from transportation incidents and homicides, Kansas, 2010
Table A-3 Fatal occupational injuries to private sector wage and salary workers, government workers, and self-employed workers by industry, Kansas, 2010
Table A-4 Fatal occupational injuries by primary and secondary source of injury for all fatalities and by major private industry¹ sector, Kansas 2010
Table A-5 Fatal occupational injuries by occupation and event or exposure, Kansas, 2010
Table A-6 Fatal occupational injuries resulting from transportation incidents and homicides by occupation, Kansas, 2010
Table A-7 Fatal occupational injuries by worker characteristics and event or exposure, Kansas, 2010
Table A-8 Fatal occupational injuries by event or exposure and age, Kansas, 2010
Table A-9 Fatal occupational injuries by event or exposure for all fatalities and major private industry¹ sector, Kansas 2010
Note: There is not data for Kansas to show Chart 4  Fatal work injuries varied between men and women, 2010, Kansas,  (79 men, 6 women), Chart 5, Fatal work injury counts in mining and oil and gas extraction (all ownerships only), and Chart 6, Occupations in the construction industry (private only.)





2010 News Release
History
 
The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) produces comprehensive, accurate, and timely counts of fatal work injuries. CFOI is a Federal-State cooperative program that has been implemented in all 50 States and the District of Columbia since 1992. To compile counts that are as complete as possible, the census uses multiple sources to identify, verify, and profile fatal worker injuries. Information about each workplace fatality--occupation and other worker characteristics, equipment involved, and circumstances of the event--is obtained by cross referencing the source records, such as death certificates, workers' compensation reports, and Federal and State agency administrative reports. To ensure that fatalities are work-related, cases are substantiated with two or more independent source documents, or a source document and a follow-up questionnaire.

Data compiled by the CFOI program are issued annually for the preceding calendar year.

These data are used by safety and health policy analysts and researchers to help prevent fatal work injuries by:
  • Informing workers of life threatening hazards associated with various jobs;
  • Promoting safer work practices through enhanced job safety training;
  • Assessing and improving workplace safety standards; and
  • Identifying new areas of safety research.
 
The National Safety Council has adopted the Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries figure, beginning with the 1992 data year, as the authoritative count for work related deaths in the United States.



Previous Injury and Illness Data Tables

2009 Data Tables and News Release

2008 Data Tables and News Release

2007 Data Tables and News Release

2006 Data Tables and News Release
 


 


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